Has the Khaki Pant Usurped the Hoodie? 5 Ways to Wear the Look

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How do you give the straightlaced khaki a badass makeover? Can the wrinkle-resistant pant beloved by square dads and polite customer service reps ever be cool? Well, it turns out, fashion month has a way of making anything possible. On the runway, accessories at Koché and Y/Project gave the sandy-hued chino a rebel bite, while models on the street put some rude attitude into the pant with their tomboy shoes and shirts. Never has the khaki looked so bad that it has actually looked good. Here, see five ways the khaki pant got some edge—and how to get the look, too.  

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8 Lessons in Mommy-and-Me Airport Style, From Chrissy Teigen to Angelina Jolie

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  Summer may have only just come to a close, but there’s no end to vacation travel for the best-dressed celebrities, who can be counted upon to make the case for impeccable airport fashion all year round. Although the notion of an A-lister appearing impossibly polished pre- and post-flight isn’t exactly what one would consider revolutionary, those mothers who manage to make it a family affair are examples worth aspiring to, and we’re taking detailed notes. Take, for instance, Chrissy Teigen who, with husband John Legend, recently arrived at LAX looking every bit the consciously coordinated couple. Forgoing the usual in-flight sneakers and sweatpants, the model turned cookbook author elevated her look from the ground up with a pair of sky-high sandals that could easily go from day to night. A robe-inspired wrap coat demonstrated what is perhaps the chicest solution to the notoriously unpredictable cabin temperatures. With her Grammy-winning man by her side, and designer stroller out in front complete with a pretty patterned blanket to shield baby Luna from photographers, Teigen toted a roomy Hermès handbag that could fit the necessary travel essentials for her little one without cramping her look. Those who wouldn’t dream of treading from the terminal to the tarmac in even the most sensible-seeming heels are right in step with Angelina Jolie. The actress and UNHCR Special Envoy stepped out in a classic pair of ballet flats that were equal parts practical and polished, while a simple V-neck sweater completed a sleek combination that belongs in every woman’s wardrobe, no matter the destination. Jolie’s 15-year-old son, Maddox, took a somewhat edgier approach, with a leather flight jacket and a beanie that radiated serious cool-kid vibes, but both mother and son topped things off with matching paparazzi-proof aviator sunglasses and a carryall slung over one shoulder. Proof that when it comes to coordinating with your children, great airport style is all in the genes.    

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Drawstring Ruching Is In for Spring 2017

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Athleisure may or may not be on the wane, but one sporty touch has taken hold in a big way this season. Namely: parachute-style ruching. The drawstring fabrications favored by Junya Watanabe from the ’90s on, and Norma Kamali even earlier (she dedicated an entire collection to the stuff with her OMO label in the ’80s) has found a whole new cachet. It’s turned up as a prominent motif of the Spring shows so far, decking out the shirts of Simon Porte Jacquemus’s Provençal maids, and with rotated trims turning up on a satin, rose-embroidered topper from Phillip Lim. But for our money, perhaps the coolest takes are the ways designers have imagined the detail in dress form; in particular, its ability to change a silhouette. Shoppers seeking more bang for their buck need look no further than a dress whose hemline can be changed six inches with the pull of a string. Donatella Versace earns top marks where athleticism is concerned, sending forth thigh-flashing purple and emerald nylon numbers to surprisingly slinky effect. At Marni, Consuelo Castiglioni challenged drawstrings to play nicely with homey, vintage-inflected florals—a bet that paid off, with one of her most gracefully arty outings to date. Here, six takes on ruching’s sporty sibling.  

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Once Again, Roos Van Bosstraeten Rules the Runway

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It’s difficult to imagine that anything happening around a fashion show could surprise Rose Van Bosstraeten, the distinctive Belgian model, widely known as Roos, who opened Simon Porte Jacquemus’s show yesterday in Paris. She is, after all, an 18-year industry veteran, having been discovered walking home from school in 1998. But Jacquemus’s deportment was a revelation. “All designers are hectic,” said Van Bosstraeten, who was amazed at the calmness and confidence of the young Frenchman. “That was new to me.” Save for a break to have her daughter, now 5, Van Bosstraeten has been working steadily. Long-haired, with almond-shaped blue eyes, and a ski-slope nose, she was a favorite of Nicolas Ghesquière’s when he was at Balenciaga, walking in every show from 1999 to 2004, and appearing four times in ads for the house. She was also a regular at Chanel and Dries Van Noten. More recently, she has become close to Guillaume Henry, for whom she opened and closed shows when he worked for Carven. Last year Jacquemus asked to meet her. “We had a chat,” Van Bosstraeten explains, “and he said, ‘I really want to work with you. I don’t know for what yet, but we will work together.’ ” Yesterday Jacquemus gave Van Bosstraeten the coveted first look in what turned out to be a breakthrough collection. The model found the backstage area surprisingly relaxed, which is just one sign, she says, of how fashion has changed since she started. “Everything is so organized and the clothes are so ready. When I first started doing shows the clothes would sometimes almost fall off your body! Backstage was hectic and chaos; loads of people just hung out, even if they had nothing to do at the show itself. Today you have to be there four hours before, the makeup is almost nothing, the hair is pretty natural. It’s become a real business; it’s a totally different perspective. Before there was no Facebook or Instagram or selfies, it was more like, ‘let’s do a show and let’s have fun.’ Today it’s [about] the instant selling of everything.” Jacquemus trades on sun-filled memories of his childhood in the South of France. “He claims he sells poetry,” explains Van Bosstraeten, when asked why she thought she was picked by the designer. “I think I represent a girl that is his type. I have a more artistic kind of face, so I fit in with that idea of poetry, and I just fit the clothes.” And how. Encore! Follow Roos @rosevanbosstraeten.  

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31 Ways to Channel Brigitte Bardot’s Classic French Girl Style Now

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The best-known photograph of Brigitte Bardot was taken in Cannes in 1953. In it, the long-haired, pout-lipped teenager, already a dancer, model, and actress, wears a flowered bikini that hid little of her Venus-like form, which BB knew quite well how to attire when she wanted to. (For a time, the actress, who turns 82 today, even had her own line of clothing.) Sure, this French sex symbol sometimes played the part of a bombshell in black leather and thigh-high boots, but a demure look was also part of her repertoire. Bardot married husband number two, heartthrob Jacques Charrier, in a lace-trimmed pink gingham shirtwaist dress by Jacques Esterel. Like most of us, BB liked to play with fashion, and her wardrobe was filled with both pretty frocks and classic trench coats, tailored suits and softly ruffled pieces, all items that designers revisited and revamped for this ’60s-inflected Fall 2016 season. Add the French girl factor and, voilá, you’ve got a look. Here, 31 ways to channel how Bardot looked then that are just right for now. Allons-y!    

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Paris Fashion Week Day 2 Forewent Insta Glamour for the Real Thing

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The languid tailoring at Lanvin, graphic floral prints at Dries Van Noten, and that mint green mac at Maison Margiela were among the day’s most chatted-about garments in Paris. It was a marked difference from the conversations around Instagram-worthy moments that dominated New York, London, and Milan Fashion Weeks. That’s not to say the Parisians don’t know how to bait iPhone wielders with a bit of drama—Dries Van Noten’s melting floral displays by Azuma Makoto appeared a hundred times over in Insta feeds today—but that they do it with the subtlety of a French ingenue. They make the clothes the star and whisper their sweet nothings rather than scream them from the rooftops. Of course, when you have the cast of supermodels who strutted for Lanvin, the studied hand of Dries Van Noten, or the magpie-like sensibility of John Galliano, you barely need to say anything at all to woo fans. Even Rihanna, the reigning queen of the titillating Instagram, traded a fashion show of moments for a more intimate venue that let her offbeat mash-up of Marie Antoinette styling and Left Coast essentials speak for itself. Maybe Alber Elbaz, a designer we’re all missing this Paris Fashion Week, was right all along when he said, “I prefer whispering. I think it goes deeper and lasts longer.” In his spirit, read today’s biggest headlines in a very soft voice.   Bouchra Jarrar Takes the Reins at Lanvin In the light-filled Hôtel de Ville, Bouchra Jarrar presented her debut fashion show as the creative director of Lanvin. The Jarrar signatures were there—see the feather trim and unstudied suiting—but the designer also imbued her collection with a bit of ease in the form of happy floral prints and some floaty violet dresses. The latter came so sheer they might qualify as negligees, but the models on the runway didn’t seem to mind. Decked out with crystal jewelry and comfortable shoes, even superstars like Karlie Kloss and Sasha Pivovarova couldn’t help but smile during the finale.   The Space Age Meets Flou at Courrèges Sébastien Meyer and Arnaud Vaillant took Courrèges on a weird trip this season. No, it wasn’t to outer space, but rather to a fancy soiree, kitting out their mod girl with minidresses with a little more ease than was found in previous seasons. Still, the hit of the collection will be a half-zip top with the Courrèges logo front and center. Even a party girl can’t resist a little logomania.   John Galliano Finds the Common Ground Between Telemarketer Headsets and Yoga Mats at Maison Margiela Now there’s a headline you never thought you’d read. But in the world of John Galliano, anything is possible. Perhaps inspired by water and water sports—we can’t know for sure, as the designer forgoes press interviews in the spirit of Martin Margiela—Galliano sent out everything from shapely mackintosh jackets to wet suits to tabi boots made to look like water shoes for Spring 2017. Models also sported pastel disco makeup and jutting crystal earrings. Maybe this creative rebus is best left unsolved . . .   Dries Van Noten Explores the Raw Beauty of Flowers Dries Van Noten is a designer who can find inspiration in the subtlest things. For Spring, he turned to the graphics of flowers, stamping outlines and shapes of wild fauna onto his collection of signature structured pieces. Models with darkened eyes and knotted sandals stomped down the runway between melting ice sculptures that encased live—or formerly alive—floral arrangements. The message of beauty and decay wasn’t lost.     Colors Rule at Rochas The artist Erwin Blumenfeld, who often collaborated with Vogue in the ’40s and ’50s, was the inspiration for the electric colors Alessandro Dell’Acqua sent out at Rochas today. Modern girls will be pleased—in a particularly dark time in the world, a pink lemonade dress is a real treat.   Lemaire Sends Out Girls on the Go Models at Lemaire’s Spring 2017 presentation diverged from the typical back-and-forth of the runways, instead meandering around the show space like a pack of well-dressed city dwellers. The heightened motion only better served to show off Christophe Lemaire and Sarah-Linh Tran’s elegant ready-to-wear, which arrived in shades of tomato red, sky blue, and marigold. The duo even experimented with prints—a rarity in Lemaire-land—offering up patched-together pieces in dots, florals, and abstract paint dabs.   Bad Gal RiRi Takes Paris What would it look like if Marie Antoinette hung out in Bushwick? Answer: Rihanna’s Spring 2017 Fenty x Puma collection. In Pepto pink, army green, bright violet, and ivory, the collection spliced Rihanna’s own wardrobe staples like hoodies and oversize jackets with those of the 18th-century royal. It might seem a bit mad, but the moment Lexi Boling stepped out onto the runway, all bad girl swagger swinging a Puma-branded fan from her fingertips, it all seemed right.  

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The 20 Flat-Out Best Alternatives to Heels for Fall

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Not to sound like an Internet meme, but the relationship a New York woman and her heels foster is one of significance. Besides investing a considerable sum of money into our vast collections, we’ve learned how to traverse the dangerous city atop their spindly spikes with an anomalous grace native only to us female city dwellers. Hopping from a cab and over subway grates; plowing through bustling sidewalks, or even daring to stand at a party on platforms, you’d think we were in sneakers until you happened to look at our stiletto-shod feet. In a city that so often makes you feel small, walking on stilts helps help New York women feel like Amazons. So it’s a pretty hard blow when a foot injury temporarily takes you out of the heel game. Still recovering from an unseemly leg injury, I attempted to slip into a pair of relatively “innocent” heels—three inches, practically child’s play—and I had to admit the incline was too much to withstand. Cursing, I slipped back into my “baby heels,” a term I have affectionately given my Martiniano Glove block heels that stand at 1.75 inches tall. Immediately I began pondering not only my health but my style. What was I to do with boot season fast approaching—especially if I wanted to avoid hobbling along in, ahem, a medical boot? Hence, zeroing in on the chic heel alternative the season begets—the closed-toe slipper, back-to-school-cool Mary Jane, the flat bootie. While Avec Modération’s Aspen Mongolia faux fur and shearling slides don’t necessarily provide height, their shaggy nature certainly would lend plenty of kick to any ensemble. Miu Miu’s Mogador and patent leather ballet flats are sure to keep one grounded in a fast-paced world, while Gucci’s Polly block heel loafer stays in chic and quirky step with the unyielding pace of the city. And isn’t that enough to elevate any look? Above, a look at the season’s 20 best options for the shoe fiends among us who know that giving up a little height doesn’t mean sacrificing style.        

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Kim Kardashian West Wins in the Season’s Trickiest Silhouette—And So Can You

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  Kim Kardashian West is a woman who wears many hats: mother, businesswoman, philanthropist, and muse to husband Kanye West. And while her jet-setting schedule might be grueling, it also affords her the opportunity to test out her fashion game on a global scale. Last night at Chelsea Piers in New York City, Kardashian West stepped out in the season’s trickiest silhouette, the midi dress, in Proenza Schouler’s fashion-forward version. While the ankle-grazing style is right at home on the runway, outside of the shows it’s been popping up on well-dressed women worldwide including Kate Middleton, who debuted perhaps her chicest moment this summer in a dress by Barbara Casasola. But it’s Kardashian West who demonstrates that it’s not just the tall girls who can get in on the midi for the new season. Her petite 5-foot-3-inch frame wears the length perfectly, with mid-calf python wedge boots creating a sense of balance. For those who want to try their hand at the look, we bring you seven figure-flattering styles for creating your own A-list moment.  

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Oh Là Là! For Its 100th, Etam Fetes French Filles and Liberté

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Etam packed in the crowds last night at the Centre Pompidou as it celebrated its 100th anniversary with a multimedia fashion show and live performances by some of France’s biggest names. The event opened with 18-year-old phenom Marina Kaye performing her hit “Homeless,” and closed after beloved 73-year-old icon Jacques Dutronc crooned his 1967 song “J’aime les Filles” and brought everyone to their feet with “Les Cactus.” In between were 80 looks—miles of lace, corsets, pearl harnesses, gilding, and strass on sweet nothings that recalled, as if anyone needed reminding, why Etam is the biggest lingerie player in France. Per usual, the show was live-streamed; new this year was a “Show Now, Shop Now” function and a brand-new Etam app with a customized photo booth. Longtime muse Natalia Vodianova sat out the event in the front row—leaving the opening honors to the brand’s new face, Constance Jablonski—but she will continue to work closely with Etam on other projects. One of those will be a dinner at the FIAC art fair next month, a showcase for a dozen specially commissioned artworks by European and Chinese artists celebrating independent women; proceeds from their sale will benefit Vodianova’s Naked Heart Foundation. “The show was great storytelling—I loved the sailor girls, the light show, the girls are always laughing and having fun,” offered Ellen von Unwerth. “Those high-waisted lacy panties were like a genie in a bottle.” Tastemaker Ali Mahdavi called out the jewelry by designer Laetitia Crahay, who managed to pull off working on two major shows back-to-back (the other was Saint Laurent). With the notable exception of up-and-coming actor Tyler Hoechlin and a rare appearance by Karen Mulder, the party was a very French affair. “We really wanted to celebrate the French touch,” noted Laurent Milchior, the third-generation co-general manager of Etam Group, as a private dinner got under way upstairs at Georges restaurant. “In the next 100 years, and specifically the next 10, we’re going to be taking that very French sense of impertinent sexiness and joyful sexiness around the world.” Oui, the U.S. is high on Etam’s list (stay tuned).    

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Rihanna on Her New Fenty x Puma Collection, and How Marie Antoinette Became Her Bad Gal Muse

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Rihanna presented her new Fenty x Puma collection in an intimate salon setting in Paris today, though legions of her fans across the globe tuned in to watch the live-stream on Tidal. Just minutes before the lights went up on the runway, as models such as Imaan Hammam, Taylor Hill, and Anwar Hadid milled about the hallways of the Hôtel Salomon de Rothschild in 18th-century-inspired streetwear looks, the singer checked in with Vogue.com for an exclusive pregame interview. Here she talks candidly about her vision for Spring 2017, about how Versailles became a major source of inspiration, and why Marie Antoinette might be the most important bad gal muse of all time. Tell us about the mood of the new collection. It was definitely a departure from the first collection; that collection had a much darker tone to it, intentionally so. To me, Spring should feel like something fresh, even though I’m not going to stop wearing black altogether. But I didn’t want it to be super-bubbly, so I kept it a bit street—everything was super-sporty and definitely highly influenced by 18th-century French culture, and the style of that time, mainly Marie Antoinette, and the Palace of Versailles. She just had this regal way about her, and everything she did was big. I wanted to mix that in with sport. I thought it would be a challenge, and it was! But I enjoyed it, and I hope that people do, too. Why did you choose to show your collection in Paris? I chose Paris because I wanted people to feel the entire tone of the new collection. I wanted them to feel like this is what Marie Antoinette might wear to the gym, or play tennis in. I imagined it like that, and I hope people receive it in a fun way. The other challenge was having to design part of the collection for men. I ended up just going back to myself for that, because, you know, I wear men’s clothes all the time. So I thought to myself, “Just design what you like to wear.” Tonight it’s going to be a very salon-style show—very French—and that idea was inspired by those old Christian Dior shows from back in the day, when he would show in a small room. When I went to the Dior headquarters and heard the story of how Christian Dior used to show in those small spaces, it stunned me, because Dior is such a huge brand. What are your first memories of Paris? I remember a lot of Coca-Cola and a lot of chocolate! Not matter where I was, even in a radio station, they always offered chips, chocolate, and Coca-Cola. I would have been 16 or 17 at the time. But I remember the architecture being so incredible to look at—the fountains in the middle of roundabouts, the streets, the lampposts. Everything here is so beautiful, it never leaves you, even if you’ve only been to Paris once. The more you come, the more you learn about the culture. Eventually I was able to go to Versailles. We shot a Dior campaign there. I was blown away to be in the halls and the rooms that Marie Antoinette roamed through. Those things stay with you, and later go on to inspire things that you do. And that’s what happened with this collection. If you could pick one song to describe this collection, what would it be? Well, funnily enough, I can give you a sort of collabo of an answer on that because the soundtrack tonight is a combination of violins mixed with trap beats. To me, that represents this collection: It’s super-regal and a perfect mix of street- and sportswear.  

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Rihanna’s Model Muse Is DJ Sita Abellán

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“This time it’s going to be more about fashion,” said Sita Abellán, when she stepped into the Vogue offices last week. Abellán was talking, of course, about her trip to Paris, a city she’s visited numerous times but as a musician rather than a model. Juggling life as an in-demand editorial star and night work as an international DJ, Abellán has spent the past year traveling around the globe playing techno and updating her popular Instagram account with pictures of her adventures. Known for her distinctive style—a typical outfit might involve a rhinestone-encrusted S&M choker, an offbeat hoodie, and Jeremy Scott pink cow-print heels—and cheeky posts, Abellán is part of the new wave of social-savvy models who seem to do it all. After months spent on her music, she plans to spend Paris Fashion Week focused on her day job, kicking things off with a walk for Fenty x Puma’s collection. Abellán’s appearance on the Fenty runway marks her second collaboration with Rihanna, who cast her in the “Bitch Better Have My Money” video back in 2015. Since then, they’ve remained friendly, thanks in part to the superstar’s approachable attitude. “I became such a fan of hers after meeting her,” Abellán says. “I didn’t expect that she would be so sweet, but when I went and had a meeting with her, I was just like, ‘Whoa, this girl is cool.’ ” The connection makes sense given their parallels. As musicians with a taste for pushing fashion boundaries, they share an audacious spirit, and now that Abellán is an artist complete with merch, and her own capsule collection, she’s starting to see the design side of the business as well. Created with pals from Polish label Misbhv, Abellán’s limited-edition collection entitled Pain will have showroom appointments this week in Paris. The concept behind the pieces is as inventive as one would expect. “I got inspired by my travels in Japan; I was impressed by the mixture of tradition and modernity of Tokyo, this blending of nostalgia and new,” says Abellán, who cites her strongest look as a kimono with matching gloves and cap. “I just invented an outfit that was going to fit this cool Japanese motorcycle girl gang that I pictured in my head.” That madcap approach to dressing is part of what has kept Abellán in the spotlight. With blue hair, cat-eye sunglasses, and wild layers of vintage sourced from global outposts, she’s a photographer’s dream. Though her outfits have become frequent street style subjects, Abellán admits that she doesn’t do much planning before stepping out in them. “I wake up and I say, ‘Okay, I’m going to wear this today!’ It’s not something that I can explain; it just comes to me naturally.” And though it’s popular at the moment, it’s taken a long time for her personal style and what’s considered chic to earn appreciation. “Growing up everyone was like, ‘Wow, this girl is crazy,’ ” Abellán says. “It’s funny to see how that perception has completely changed. Now people see [the way I dress] as cool.” Set to head back out on the Destructo tour after the show week wraps, Abellán is eager to hit another milestone: an album release. “When we go back to Milan I’m going to work on my music,” she says. “I hope that next year I can come out with something that would be incredible.” Even without a record, Abellán is living the rock star life and that’s got to count for something. “In just one year I’ve been so many places and I’ve been able to do so many things, so I’m really happy and excited to see how this is going to grow. I just want to continue doing more and more.” Watch this space.   Kendall Jenner, Cara Delevingne, and more of Rihanna’s Navy pay tribute to “Work”:

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Turn Heads in the Front Row Like Kendall, Gigi, and Bella

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Models don’t belong strictly to the runway. They’re turning up in the front rows of Fashion Week, sharing coveted space with celebrity guests—and it turns out, they manage to make a stylish impression off the catwalk, too. Look to Gigi Hadid who arrived at Versus Versace clad in all black (with beau Zayn Malik on her arm), while a few seats down, Jessica Hart and Jourdan Dunn smoldered in miniskirt ensembles. At Dolce & Gabbana, the shipment of Instagram-loving millennial guests included Lucky Blue Smith who wore a white suit, while his model sisters showed up in a cheerful mélange of a polka-dotted jumpsuit, a feathered frock, and a dress in a blush hue. Kendall Jenner made her familial appearance at Yeezy in an all-cream look, and Bella Hadid turned up at Kith in a short pink dress and strapped gladiator sandals. Never has been being off the runway looked so good. Here, five ways to get the supermodel front row look.   Kendall Jenner knows the secret to always being party ready. Produced by Vogue with Estée Lauder. 

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Nufferton, a Line “Dreamed Up in Sweden,” Is Jumping Into Fashion’s Pajama Game

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There are few certainties in life, or fashion, but the odds are that you’ll be adding a pair of pajamas to your wardrobe in the near future. No Magic 8 Ball was needed to make this prediction; the Spring runways offer proof enough that designers are carrying on with the pajama party. And there are options aplenty, from both ready-to-wear lines and those dedicated to loungewear. New to the game is a brand from Sweden, with a funny, made-up name that sounds like it might belong to a lovably clumsy character in a children’s book: Nufferton. The line was dreamt up in Stockholm, where winter nights are very long indeed, by creative directors Henrik Düfke and Felipe Montt. The former admen, who had worked together in London and New York, and share an interest in brands, fashion, and uniforms, debuted their unisex collection earlier this year, and are now releasing their sophomore offering. As gender neutrality is a big talking point in Sweden, it’s unsurprising that Nufferton was conceived as a genderless line, but, Düfke clarifies, “we didn’t make our products unisex to jump on the bandwagon. We just weren’t very keen on the ‘sexy’ lingerie type loungewear that is made for women or the boxy, unflattering pajamas that you find for men.” Nufferton’s silhouettes are lean, though more generous than the skinny fit Swedes love for jeans. And while Düfke and Montt can’t guarantee customers a good night’s sleep, their colorful and functional Nufferton pajamas do offer a “playful” take on Scandi minimalism that’s sure to brighten many a dark night, or all-white interior, for that matter.    

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Chanel and Dior Sound Designer Michel Gaubert Creates the Perfect Paris Fashion Week Playlist

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Fashion’s go-to sound designer Michel Gaubert needs no introduction. For many years the native Parisian has been overseeing the musical direction of brands such as Chanel, Dior, Loewe, Proenza Schouler, Fendi, Chloé, Rodarte, Louis Vuitton, Acne Studios, Sacai, Valentino, and the list goes on. A music obsessive for as long as he can remember, Gaubert grew up making record-buying trips to London as a teenager, then worked in record stores, deejayed at Le Palace in Paris, and now, shapes the sounds of the runway. This week, the industry’s most sought-after DJ takes over Vogue’s Apple Music channel to create a Paris Fashion Week playlist. Vogue.com spoke to him this week about the creative process of putting fashion to music, how technology is transforming the world of deejaying, and why Paris has perhaps the most diverse sound in the industry. Hello, Michel, how’s Paris? I got back last night from Milan, so it’s been, you know [laughs]. I did too much. I had two meetings today, I went to Dior, and I went to Chloé. Earlier this month, when we first talked about your Vogue playlist, you mentioned wanting your tracks to reflect your mood of the moment. What was the feeling when you created it? You know, there are things I play that are more popular but you don’t need me to play Young Thug, pop music like this, so I went for things that would be more obscure, that you might only hear at a fashion show or that maybe out of context could be nice. That was the kind of mood. Also, I wanted to catch the vibe of the shows in New York and Milan. So there’s a few tracks from Fendi, Pucci, Proenza, Rodarte, Etro, Ferragamo, Adam Selman, Lacoste. A few of the shows I did in New York and Milan. And London! Some are heavy; some are not. But you don’t need a diploma to listen to them [laughs]—I tried to make it user-friendly. Where do you go for your personal music? Do you use your phone? I don’t like to use my phone for music. I have a small computer, which is like a small Mac but it’s 500 gigabytes, so I call it my big iPod, you know? So I use that. And also I have a big iPad that I use for music. And doing what I do, it’s a bit complicated to manage all my music; I mean, it’s super messy. I have a list of projects that I’m working on, then I have a list of things that I want to listen to, to discover music, and then there’s a list of things I like for myself. I suppose you have an almost infinite amount of music. Yeah, it’s insane. Like, if I tell you how much I have on my iTunes, it’s crazy. I have 2,022 days’ worth of music. That is crazy. So that’s about almost seven years [laughs]. Do you find that the way music is going with technology it opened more doors? The fact that there’s pretty much no limit anymore to finding what you’re looking for. Do you find that helpful? No, not really, I think in general there’s too much of everything anyway. I would call myself a curator—it’s like being a stylist and curating something, even though that word sounds pretentious. It’s not easy; there’s too much of everything. It takes a lot of time to find all the new things. Obviously you have “this is a new thing, it’s cool, it’s cool,” but there’s so much I have to listen to so I think it has become more difficult, it’s all over the place. It was more rigorous like 15 years ago, but I’m not missing that time. I have certain websites I go to, certain magazines I read, a lot of people send me music, but honestly it’s like an overload. There’s an avalanche of music. I like the parallel with the work of a stylist, and how every day there’s more to draw inspiration from. Exactly, at New York [Fashion Week] there’s almost 15 shows a day, so if you see everything, that’s a lot of clothes. Music is the same, and movies, there’s more of this, more of that, with technology, it’s a lot. There might be like 10 albums, maybe 25 albums, that are really good throughout the year, that you can really call “good-good” albums. There’s good tracks, you know? But good albums are hard to find. I’m going to sound passé, but to me the perfect album was before the CD, it was the vinyl, which had two sides and you couldn’t put more than, maybe at the most, 40 minutes of music. And now albums are like an hour and 10, an hour and 20, which is a lot. It’s better when you do less [laughs]. It’s like a collection, better to do 35 looks than 65, because how can you extend your idea, you know? Now it’s track by track. If I hear an album and it’s like 12 tracks and there are two I like or three I like, I think it’s a good album [laughs]. Are you drawn to one particular musical genre more than the others or is it really open for you? It’s very open. I mean, of course when I get new projects there’s a certain genre I will go for maybe first, because of my personal taste. I’m more electronic, maybe R&B, rock less. Especially now, I think rock is not so interesting and folk is not really my thing. But you know, when it’s good, it’s really good. It’s very strange: There’s also lots of reissues, lots of old things that people are digging and so you listen to old and new things, and then you don’t make the difference between the new and old anymore. It really doesn’t matter; it’s a different way to listen to music. You approach it differently. What have you been listening to lately for pleasure? There’s a track called “The Feeling When You Walk Away” by Yves Tumor, I don’t know why I like that track, I think it’s cool, I like weird stuff. I don’t know how to explain what I like and why I like it. Anything from the Parisian music scene? Do you have a connection with it? Some of them! I like this French band called La Femme. I put it in the playlist. I like them, I think they’re cool, I like their sound and the lyrics are good. I like this song called “Septembre.” Do you title your soundscapes? How do you come about the naming of them? Well, the last show for Fendi I called it The Fendi Trianon because it was very 18th century. Marie Antoinette used to live in the Trianon so I called it that. I have things on Mixcloud. The men’s soundtrack was called Le Petit Prince—I always like to have names. Sometimes I just call them Code X, you know? I cannot talk about it. The next Chanel show I’m calling Code X [laughs]. What is the difference between picking music for the posts that go on your own social media or the sound design for a fashion brand? My Instagram, you mean the sound on the little films I make? It’s whatever fits the image—you know what I mean? I’m not trying to promote my musical taste or anything I truly like. It doesn’t matter what it is, you know? It’s very accidental. I mean, usually I just try songs from my computer, to be honest. Yesterday I did three or four of them and I just used the songs that just came on. I imagine you have an archive within yourself, but do you use technology like Shazam sometimes? Oh yeah, of course I use Shazam. Sometimes, when I travel and I’m in a taxicab or whatever, and I don’t know or don’t remember what it is, of course I use Shazam. Now about your beginnings, what got you started in music? It started when I was a kid. I was watching TV shows with music in my room, reading all the music magazines, and listening to music all the time, and I made my world, you know what I mean? I just fell into it, I don’t know why. You know? I was very receptive. My parents were listening to music, and I knew what they were listening to. I don’t know. It just came to me. I never decided, “Oh, I’m going to listen to music, I’m going to do this or do that”; it just happened. And then when I was a teen I used to go to London a lot, spending a lot of time in record stores, going to concerts. Then when I was older I worked at a record store and as a DJ at Le Palace in Paris, and then all of this happened—it just came that way. How have you changed musically over the years? First of all, I’m not afraid [laughs]. I never have the anxiety of the white page, the blank sheet, or whatever. Never afraid of looking at a project. So that’s changed. I’m less stressed about doing something. It doesn’t mean that sometimes I don’t feel very well because I don’t know where I’m going, but I know that I’m going to make it . . . so I feel more secure about it. And also, my musical taste has changed; I’m more tolerant. The more I work with people in fashion, the more I listen to what they tell me. It’s not just “Michel Gaubert doing something for someone,” it has to be a mix of both. I listen to what they say: Sometimes they come up with strange ideas; sometimes they make sense; sometimes they don’t make sense to me. So I help them, “Okay, if you like this, which is maybe too famous or overused, maybe we should go there, there, and there.” I like that game. Listening to people is very important. I think communication is the most important. If you could, how would you describe the sound of Paris Fashion Week? I think it would sound very busy! A lot of people talking, singing in cafés. Paris is so varied, so many different shows, maybe I would find it a bit more unexpected than New York or Milan. Because there’ve been so many shows already, and all the cool things of the moment have been used. I think that in Paris people tend to go a different way. You know, people are less obsessed with a new hit as they used to be. I think Paris is a mix of a lot of things, multilayered, very cross-cultural. In Paris you have Belgian designers, Korean designers, Japanese designers, Spanish, Portuguese, American, French designers . . . it’s super big. And not necessarily people who live here but people who travel from their country to show their fashion because that’s where they think it belongs, so I think the soundtrack of Paris is maybe more cross-cultural than anywhere else. But that’s me seeing it that way. This interview has been condensed and edited.   Listen to a preview of Michel Gaubert’s Vogue Paris Fashion Week playlist below. To hear the full tracks and more of our playlists, released every week, visit the Vogue channel on Apple Music.    

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Can You Wear a See-Through Dress IRL?

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It feels like it’s been ages since Anja Rubik was kicked off Instagram for posting a photo of herself in Anthony Vaccarello’s Fall ’14 show, wearing a super-sheer blouse that let her nipples peek through. The censorship seemed to suggest that a woman’s nipples were offensive, spurring Rubik’s “Don’t Fear the Nipple” movement and a bigger conversation about empowering women to embrace their sexuality. Fast-forward two and a half years, and Rubik was freeing the nipple again on Vaccarello’s runway last night—this time for his Saint Laurent debut—wearing a whisper of a black blouse sprinkled with crystals. Vaccarello isn’t the only designer favoring the braless, see-through look this season. At Lanvin this morning, Bouchra Jarrar showed a transparent purple gown with long sleeves, a pussy-bow necktie, and not a shred of lining. Fendi whipped up rococo-inspired dresses that exposed the nipples, too, like the gossamer frock Gigi Hadid wore, while models at Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini floated out in sheer lace dresses cinched with leather belts. The common denominator? A “covered-up” silhouette—like a long-sleeved blouse or high-necked dress—subverted by the breast-baring silk or chiffon. That being said, freeing the nipple IRL is still somewhat taboo, so the probability of seeing any of these looks on the street (or even the red carpet) is slim. Plus, once the dresses hit stores, they’ll likely come with linings or slips anyway; either that or you’ll have to get clever with your own underpinnings. Which begs the question—what’s the point of baring it all on the runway? While you ponder the question, scroll through nine sheer looks from the season thus far in the slideshow above.    

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