This German Model’s Breakout Bob Is Our New Fall Hair Inspiration—And Here’s Why

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The quirky blunt bob has been spotted everywhere, of late—turning up on a fleet of models at the Fall 2016 runway shows or skimming the tufted collar of a tweed Vetements coat in the September issue of Vogue. The latter belongs to Lou Schoof, the German model of the moment, and has single-handedly dredged up our desire for the sharp, chin-grazing cut—a dramatic fall look with particular game-changing power. “It was a new beginning,” she says, calling from a lakeside retreat in the German countryside, of the look, whose earliest incarnation she adopted nearly four years ago. The chop came not long after the 21-year-old was scouted on a train, at a small salon around the corner from her agency in Hamburg. “When I started modeling, I was determined to have a look,” she says. Needless to say, the high-stakes makeover has more than paid off—with frequent editorial work, often alongside her equally head-turning brother Nils—and for Schoof, the cut was a case of love-at-first-sight. “I was like yeah, that’s my haircut, and I haven’t changed it since.” The geometric shape is a surprisingly low-maintenance one, beyond monthly trims usually received on-set. “My hair tends to be very curly, so it always looks a bit undone,” she adds, “but as soon as I straighten it, it’s very clean and cool.” There’s a ph-balanced shampoo each morning, a bit of coconut oil combed through the ends, then a quick scrunch of the hands (“It’s a two-minute thing.”). “I can’t really think about having another haircut, I feel like I would be another person without it,” Schoof says. “It’s my thing.” Now that’s the mark of a bona fide beauty signature.    

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Gucci Mane Looks Like a Million Bucks in Alexander McQueen

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As Gucci Mane—né Radric Davis—recently confessed to us here at Vogue.com, his 75-pound weight loss has opened up the prolific rapper to the world of high fashion and online shopping. Outré designs from Louis Vuitton, Gucci (naturally), Giuseppe Zanotti, and Hugo Boss are finding a home in his expanding wardrobe these days—and judging by a recent Instagram post, Alexander McQueen is in there, too. Donning an expertly tailored blazer peppered with the label’s signature butterflies and a sleek pair of black ankle-length trousers, the Atlanta native seemed to immediately take to the brand. Adding a pair of black patent Jimmy Choo Peter loafers, sans socks, he brought a classic Rat Pack vibe to the look. His Butler, Davis, appeared just as dapper in a tailcoat, posing by the rapper’s side with a platter of stacked bills in his gloved hands. Which begs the question: What will Gucci buy next?    

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Ophélie Guillermand Will School You on This Whole French Girl Style Thing

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For many, the idea of French girl style—that carefree yet perfectly coordinated manner of dress perfected by icons like Inès de la Fressange—is something of an obsession. Even those who’ve had enough of the plethora of books, blogs, and articles dedicated to the subject can’t help but admire the certain chic that it embodies—but for actual French women, it’s not all that mystifying. “To be honest, I didn’t understand it at first,” says Ophélie Guillermand, the gamine model born in Verdun whose minimalist wardrobe has made her a favorite of street style photographers. “Perhaps it has to do with being French, as ‘French style’ didn’t seem like anything particularly special or different while growing up.” Once Guillermand began to travel internationally for work, the distinctions in dressing became apparent. “I instantly noticed the differences in how people dress outside of France,” she says. But on a personal level, being exposed to a variety of takes on fashion helped to broaden her own choices. Working with such names as Phoebe Philo, Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele, and Miuccia Prada helped to bring her look to the next level. “To me, those are strong women who use fashion to communicate so much,” says Guillermand. “I try to say ‘Never say never!’ You can take the ‘craziest’ pieces, and if you mix them with the right things, there is always the potential to look amazing.” Embracing Philo’s polished minimalism, Prada’s eclecticism, and Cerf de Dudzeele’s fearlessness, Guillermand opts for a pared-down color palette, unusual silhouettes, and plenty of statement accessories. “I tend to wear a lot of black, but I like to mix textures and shapes to keep it interesting,” says the model. “A skinny jean paired with a larger shirt, or something tighter and cropped on top with a baggier jean.” A handbag addict with a taste for one-of-a-kind pieces, Guillermand goes for both the latest It purse or a cool retro find: “I’m always obsessed with a new bag purchase. Right now, I’m debating between getting a vintage classic Chanel bag or perhaps one of the newer ones from last season. Maybe both if I’m feeling a little frivolous!” Currently digging her python Gucci Dionysus, Isabel Marant’s rope sandals, and vintage Levi’s shorts, Guillermand epitomizes the ease of French style even when work takes her around the globe. And don’t kid yourself, these days she can see the appeal. “To me, the obsession likely comes from French style being mostly about looking ‘perfectly effortless,’ no matter what you wear,” she says. Guillermand has a few pro tips for those aiming to get a little of that Parisian charm in their closets. “The best way to create an outfit is to take the time to try on different pieces together. The best stylists in the business are constantly editing, and it’s unlikely you’ll find ‘the look’ on the first try,” she says. “My personal style is always evolving, and it certainly has grown the longer that I’ve been in this business. That’s why I like fashion; you can always reinvent yourself.”  

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True Romance’s Style Is More Relevant Today Than Ever

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I defy you to find any instance of bad taste that looks as good as True Romance. As we approach the anniversary of True Romance’s release (at 23, not a landmark anniversary, but one nonetheless), its lurid, supersaturated aesthetic feels as relevant as ever. While Quentin Tarantino’s already bravado-drenched screenwriting gave the film’s young lovers on the run their full-throttle story line, their equally full-throttle outfits came courtesy of costume designer Susan Becker (in the ’80s she also dressed the cast of St. Elmo’s Fire and the oft-referenced vampires of The Lost Boys). The movie’s protagonists could well be the faces of fashion’s gleefully over-the-top spirit in recent seasons, taste that’s so bad it’s done a lap and arrived back in the neighborhood of the appealing. Patricia Arquette’s call girl, Alabama Worley, is a vision of fuchsia, leopard spots, and aqua. Her costumes see the runways’ recent yen for bralettes and boudoir dressing and raise it: Arquette dons a teal bra in place of a shirt, or layers it with a timely feeling flounced off-the-shoulder top (sheer, natch). Her cow-print mini speaks to the kind of kitschy Westernwear proposed for Fall by Jeremy Scott and so many others. Of course, a dreamy young Christian Slater as the Elvis-worshipping Clarence is nothing to sniff at either; his ’50s-inflected look damn near doubles as a mirror of men’s street style at the moment. Three years before Leo donned that so-referenced Hawaiian shirt in Romeo + Juliet, Becker dusted off the retro mainstay for Slater’s character and gave it a cool new tenor. For his movie theater date with Alabama, Clarence sports a tweedy jacket and bowling shirt of just the sort proposed for guys by both Dries Van Noten and Lucas Ossendrijver at Lanvin. Our antihero, like Travis Bickle and Frank Serpico before him, even sports an M-65 field jacket in the film’s early scenes (presumably a nod to the equally blood-spattered Taxi Driver). As for borrowing from your S.O.? Both Alabama and Clarence nail it with his-and-hers hoodies. . . and in the film’s final scenes she looks particularly badass in his cheapo tinted Elvis shades.    

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Kate Middleton Isn’t the Only One Repeating Outfits: Vogue Editors on How to Wear a Look Again . . . And Again

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Duchesses: They’re just like us! Or so, might Kate Middleton’s consistent re-wearing of the same outfit suggest. It’s certainly become one of the most relatable qualities the style maven and mother of two has showcased over her chic reign, with her fashion-recycling plan endearing her to her adoring public. Just today, the Duchess of Cambridge zipped into a familiar blue-and-white floral L.K. Bennett shift dress that she first debuted in 2014, and continued to flout the age-old myth that the truly stylish would never deign to repeat a look. But it’s worth noting that a two-year lapse between wears lends itself to the belief that Middleton may have a well-thought-out methodology to her fashion repeats—and in this, she’s definitely not alone. Despite the fact that Vogue.com’s dress code invites experimentation, my colleagues and I have all found ourselves continually buttoning ourselves back into looks filled with staying power. Perhaps we’ve fallen for those Adidas track pants that somehow go with just about every blouse in our closet, or we stumbled upon an unexpectedly chic combination of clashing pieces, or, in a time crunch, we relied upon old faithful of a white tee and mom jeans—whatever the case, style reruns are par for the course. Shaming ourselves over an encore ensemble, as Vogue.com’s Market Editor Chelsea Zalopany explains, is both unnecessary and futile. As Zalopany puts it, “If I get a good look going, I’ll wear it over and over again until I’ve gotten it out of my system—exactly the same from top to bottom!” Vogue Runway Director Nicole Phelps matter-of-factly admits she wore the same Lemaire dress two days in a row last week: “I have very little anxiety about repeating outfits these days—no one is paying that close attention,” she says. That’s not to suggest that there aren’t rules—namely, timing. Upon further polling of my colleagues, two days seems to be the universal limit within a week, allowing for a sizable break between reappearances. And once that outfit is broken out again, new accessories or styling is mandatory. You’d be surprised how things look entirely different that way: “A lot of my old dresses that I forgot about are coming out of boxes as I move into my new apartment, and I’ve given them a second life by pairing them with Converse,” says Vogue.com Market Editor Kelly Connor. One thing that all Vogue.com staffers agree on? Featuring one outfit multiple times either on social media or around the same group of people will leave an outfit dead in the water. “The only time I’m really fine about repeating an outfit is if I know I will be with a totally different group of people,” Vogue.com Market Assistant Elizabeth Taufield reluctantly admits. “I know it sounds silly, because at the end of the day, what’s all the fuss about? But it’s something I’m always pretty aware of.” But her apprehension may be well-founded: Culture Writer Patricia Garcia has been called out before for wearing the same outfit in different Instagram pictures. “It’s a thing!” she insists. In fact, if we’re being honest, the Duchess of Cambridge is one of the few capable of getting away with being photographed twice in a look. But as proven, she’s not the only one who can get away with a repeat offense.  

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Don’t Let a Summer Shower Cramp Your Style

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By this point in the summer, dressing for skyrocketing temps should be a no-brainer. Shorts in the office? There’s a formula for that. Super-sheer see-through tops that leave little to the imagination, or breezy warm-weather silks that are utterly breathable? Totally possible, too! Those tricky sartorial situations aside, we never want to let a little heat ruin your look—and there’s no reason an unexpected summer shower should, either. Sure, they come on suddenly, often out of nowhere (and if you’re ill-prepared, will leave you nothing short of drenched), but with a few key items, a brief midday downpour shouldn’t dampen your day. As Market Assistant Elizabeth Taufield likes to think, “While rain is usually a drag, a sun-shower is much less of a nuisance,” by which she means that it’s important to wear something light, like a minidress, or denim shorts, “and have an umbrella or windbreaker on hand.” Turn to Jil Sander for a hooded rain jacket in a bold blue, and opt for a PVC Loewe bag for a grown-up twist on the kiddie plastic raincoat. As for your footwear, you better think twice about wearing your best shoes—even a little drizzle can wreak havoc! Go forth in a pair of waterproof rubber sandals and maybe keep your eyes peeled for that post-downpour arc of color in the sky—there’s going to be absolutely no raining on your parade.  

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Hailey Baldwin on Airport Style, Uggs, and the Superstars Who Inspire Her Style

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“I must have been 11 or 12 when I got my first Uggs,” said Hailey Baldwin, the Australian surf brand’s latest campaign star. The 19-year-old model styles her cozy, suede boots much the same way she did when she was a kid: think skinny jeans or sweats when she wants to be super comfy. “I’m wearing them with jean shorts right now [but] with the Ugg Classic Street collection it’s a lot easier to pair boots with day-to-day clothing,” she says. Baldwin is often spotted alongside her fellow model buddies including Kendall Jenner, and sisters Gigi and Bella Hadid, and admits taking style cues from “people I work with, and [people I] look up to.” The cool off-duty ensembles she has been known to wear—a lace dress with sneakers, say— are inspired by  superstars such as Margot Robbie  and Rihanna. “I love Rihanna, I think her style just pushes a lot of boundaries,” she says. “My tomboy side takes inspiration from her.” Baldwin’s fashion ethos is also all about comfort, just as you might expect. “I keep it true to myself—simple and chic and classic, but at the same time a little bit edgy,” she says. Her go-to uniform for castings is easily replicable—“all black everything, pair of jeans, boots or heeled boots, and a leather jacket”—though her all-time favorite piece for any occasion is probably the bomber. “I have to stop buying so many because it’s getting ridiculous!” says Baldwin who plans to up her fall fashion game with pieces from Emilio Pucci, Louis Vuitton, and Chanel. As for as how’s she’s prepping for fashion-month travel?  Let’s just say she’s not scrimping on chic layering pieces. “I hate being cold on airplanes,” she says. “It’s always going to be some type of sweatshirt, I really like Vetements.” Is there anything she’s excited to see this season? “New Saint Laurent, because Anthony [Vaccarello] has taken over—now that’s going to be interesting.” No doubt her new street style wardrobe will be, too.  

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This Is the Face of Ukraine’s Musical Revolution

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Kristina Bardash may just be the unlikeliest face to ever helm a musical revolution. In less than a year, the 25-year-old singer, who performs under the stage name “Luna” (“moon,” in Russian), has captured the imagination of the youth of her home country, Ukraine, with both her voice and the music videos and personal style that go along with it. Unlike her glossy contemporaries, who issue blockbuster pop music, the songs off of Bardash’s debut album, Magneti, are quietly powerful: hypnotic, repetitive, with light ebbing electro beats under a popping electronic keyboard, dipping into a trancelike lullaby. Her success started organically, to hear Bardash tell it, all stemming from a Facebook post promoting the music video for her single “Ocen” (“Autumn”). “I didn’t use any PR. All I did was put it on the Internet, and then people just shared it. I didn’t put any money into it,” says the singer, who has a lanky, model-esque figure and a slightly elfin face, sitting in her Kiev apartment turned music studio. “I wanted everything to be natural in this process.” Six months later, all of her concerts in Kiev are sold out. Bardash’s personal style is just as out of this world as her moniker: On the day we meet, she wears a short Pepto pink Roberto Cavalli button-up dress, which seems more probable on the wife of a Slavic mafioso, but somehow manages to make the thigh-skimming minidress look both casual and totally her own. “My style, naturally, is pushed more often by my mood,” says the singer, “and the same goes for my music.” And like her music, Bardash’s style is accessible to her fans, as well. Though she shops at luxury boutiques like Helen Marlen and Asthik, the singer also favors Lesnoy, the secondhand bazaar flooded by Kiev’s youth. Bardash—her music and her style—has begun to represent a symbol of change in the shifting mainstream, and her rise could not have come at a better time for the Ukrainian music industry. The post-Soviet country is perpetually in the news, which either focuses on the conflict-stricken capital or the Russia-bordering bullet-ridden region in the east. But on the fashion front, it’s become a hub of rebirth: There’s the recent promotion of traditional dress, like the vyshyvanka, and designers like Anton Belinskiy taking the idea of war and morphing it into something both wearable and chic. Bardash borrows from the ’90s of the post–Soviet Union, a once cast-off era that’s become a red-hot trend, thanks to clothing labels like Vetements and Gosha Rubchinskiy, which celebrate the same things that her music does. Her videos are often lo-fi and grainy, reminiscent of a moving zine or a bootleg VHS tape. Her most viewed is “Ocen,” a three-minute sepia-saturated clip she filmed alone on her laptop on the playground of her self-described “ghetto” childhood neighborhood in Kiev. It was not an easy shoot. “I shot it for two hours and then it was erased because I had no more memory on my computer,” says Bardash. “Then my son started crying!” In the video, Bardash wears a mismatched mélange of ’90s-era attire (lace-trimmed short shorts, a turtleneck, and a long camel-hued coat with scuffed-up white running sneakers) that wouldn’t look out of place on the Vetements runway. Her 4-year-old son, George, makes a cameo in an oversize peacoat and turtleneck. In other videos, Bardash’s style is just as evocative of the era. A preview to her video “Butilichka” (or “Bottle”) on Instagram shows the singer with fist-size hoops, hair heaped into a bun-bouffant, and a slip dress, a look still popular in the far-reaching provincial towns, while for “Malchik, Ti Sneg” (“Boy, You Are Snow”), Bardash wears a turtleneck and a slick tan trenchcoat that she tells me she got from a secondhand market. Like many people behind Ukraine’s current youthquake, Bardash cites the ’90s as her main source of inspiration. “It was a revolution in the mind of our people, that now they can do what they want, that they can buy nice looks. People in the Soviet Union were very strict, and then these people opened up all of these channels and borders,” says Bardash, showing me a YouTube video of a couple on a motorcycle in Kiev in 1993, driving around the empty, clean streets of the relatively newly minted country. “It was a time for our people to be inspired. They were listening to good music, and making good music. Also, at this time my parents were so cool and stylish. They were listening to all this music while I was growing up during this time. It is always my question: ‘Why? Why is pop music now in Russia and Ukraine soulless, not like it was in the ’90s?’ I love Kiev, it is a perfect city, but some people destroy culture,” she says about the influx of commercialization, adding, “But now there is a new generation, like me, new guys who are changing the situation.”      

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Get Fall’s Biggest Trends Without Going Broke

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Though a splurge is always a good idea when it comes to top-shelf wardrobe staples, for of-the-moment pieces, however, there’s more than a sliver of a chance that you can’t invest that same coin. With the impending month of shows (and the onslaught of enviable street style), we’re taking a savvy look at the season’s key trends, well within the three-figure range. Want to snag a brocade ankle boot without breaking the bank? You’re in luck. Some tweedy, menswear-inflected tailoring? We’ve found that, too. Even plush velvet thigh-highs—timely indeed, but perhaps tricky to rationalize in terms of cost-per-wear—can be yours for a relatively modest sum. Here, a sampling of fashionable buys to keep your closet feeling current, all clocking in at under $250 apiece.  

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Gigi Hadid’s It Bag Game Is So Carrie Bradshaw

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The nameplate necklace, pashmina, fancy shoes, and a killer bag—these are just some of the signature pieces that made up Carrie Bradshaw’s eclectic wardrobe on Sex and the City. And while it’s been well over a decade since Carrie, portrayed by Sarah Jessica Parker, and her cohorts were on the small screen, their influence lives on; clearly millennial superfans, including Gigi Hadid, are picking up where SATC left off. The model has demonstrated her fashion savoir faire off the runway, sporting velvet booties, the off-the-shoulder top, and the summer shearling in the past few months, and last night in West Hollywood, the 21-year-old, joined by model sister Bella, took clever styling cues from the hit HBO show. While the crop top and cropped Frame jeans are SoCal-inspired reworkings of the classic supermodel off-duty uniform, Hadid elevated the look with key accessories. A rose fabric choker cleverly played off the tones of her pashmina and Charlotte Olympia sandals, with a Fendi Baguette as the pièce de résistance. With its micro-floral print, romantic colors, and touch of python, Hadid’s Baguette was a riff on traditional festival-girl fare, only far, far chicer. With New York Fashion Week on the horizon, it’s likely she has more street style tricks like this in her bag.   It’s never a dull moment with Gigi Hadid:

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Can Jaden Smith Make the Scooter Suitcase Cool?

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Jaden Smith is no stranger to skateboarding—he’s a SoCal native, after all. Occasionally taking to empty Calabasas mall parking lots to flex his skills, he’s like any American teenager trying their hand at ollies and kick-flips—even if he’s being trailed by prying paparazzi. So it was hardly a surprise to see The Get Down star kicking and pushing his way through Japan’s Narita airport terminal today, but what was novel was his mode of transportation: The freewheeling teen was actually scooting aboard his module suitcase. Breaking out a scooter suitcase—luggage that unfolds into a connected scooter—the Louis Vuitton campaign star joyfully breezed past the throngs of awaiting fans that were hoping to grab a glimpse of him and his father, Suicide Squad’s Will Smith. An airport style game changer, to be sure, the efficient contraption perfectly complemented his mall rat look of a vintage Harley-Davidson tee, oversize sweats, and a baseball hat cocked to the side. Always ahead of the style curve, so to speak (remember that caped Batman suit he wore to Kim and Kanye’s wedding . . . and then to his own prom?), Smith’s three-wheeler felt like another example of his need for speed—his new Tesla being another. Certainly no comparison to the supercharged sports car, his trolley still puts a cool (and faster) spin on getting to the gate on time.   Jaden and Willow Smith on how they define creativity at Met Gala 2016:

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How Gigi and Bella Hadid Do the Body-Con Skin Reveal

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A strategic flash of skin is as much a part of the supermodel repertoire as a good topknot moment or a mastery of stealth contouring, but only Gigi and Bella Hadid could take showcasing your summer bronze to black swan/white swan extremes. Spotted at young Hollywood hangout The Nice Guy in Los Angeles last night, the supermodel sisters sent flashbulbs popping with two distinct ways to take sun-kissed skin for a late-summer victory lap. Gigi bared her athletic abs with an off-the-shoulder crop top that felt sporty thanks to a bushy high ponytail and a soft wash of copper shadow. Bella, on the other hand, turned heads with a plunging down-to-there top and black lace-up pants that offered a peek of her gleaming legs, while a glossy knot and a choker gave another wink to bondage-inspired style. But whether you’re more inclined toward a SoCal-inspired beauty moment or prefer the classic sex-appeal of a deep décolleté, one thing’s for sure: It’s time to stock up on body oil. It’s never a dull moment with Gigi Hadid:

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La Perla Has a New Creative Director and a Surprising New Approach to Ready-to-Wear

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Think for a moment about the wardrobes of Rihanna, Kim Kardashian West, and Gigi Hadid, and you’ll realize that a vast majority is comprised of lingerie-inspired pieces, from slip dresses to corsets worn as tops. It’s great timing, then, that La Perla, the luxury Italian intimates brand famed for its lacy little things, is expanding its ready-to-wear presence under a new creative director, Julia Haart—or so you’d think. Speaking with Haart on the phone in advance of the announcement, the designer explained that her intentions for the brand go deeper than just capitalizing on the style trends of the moment. “What we’re trying to do with this ready to wear collection is to bring something newer to the market. I think women want a new choice, and what I mean by that is I think women have been told their entire lives that you have to suffer for beauty. Well, I don’t believe in that, and I would like to give women a new choice,” she began. “I thought about all the things that bother me about clothing, like those pieces that you just have so much difficulty finding that I would call the essentials of any woman’s wardrobe, and that’s what I geared this collection towards. I thought of all the things that I had a hard time finding or that never fit well, like a simple white button down shirt that stays and doesn’t move, isn’t cut for a man or is too tight—just those simple basics!” If the notion of “wardrobe essentials” seems at odds with the louche brand of sexiness La Perla has long touted, Haart is quick to note that in her mind, women can be sexy and in suiting simultaneously. “I love that La Perla has this sexy, sensual kind of image, and I certainly would never want to change La Perla’s DNA. My idea is that you can embrace your femininity and it doesn’t have to be only in your undergarments. If you’re wearing a suit, a dress, it should be formed to a female form while still being professional, beautiful, chic, elegant—one does not negate the other,” she said. Construction is key to Haart’s vision, and she plans to apply La Perla’s 62 years of knowledge about lingerie forms into its ready-to-wear. Among the things one can expect in her debut collection are a double faced silk dress—“so that it’s as soft on the inside as it is on the outside,” Haart said—and suiting with internal construction to emulate lingerie. “That is to say we put the bra into the suit,” she explains. “It’s one piece, so you just put it on and it has support but it’s comfortable and it moves with you and it feels as soft on the inside as the outside.” Haart’s obsession with comfort is longstanding. Her eponymous shoe collection is grounded in the idea that sexy heels can be comfortable—so much so that she’s developed proprietary arch molds that allow for gel insoles to be “hidden” inside the shoes. Haart joins La Perla as creative director after working closely with it on accessory collections for Spring and Fall 2016. She arrives after Pedro Lourenço’s yearlong contract expired in the role, where he worked to amp up the house’s ready-to-wear with a boudoir spirit.

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The Future of the Fashion Show: Super-Stylist Lotta Volkova

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Lotta Volkova has been called the “coolest stylist in the industry,” “queen of the Parisian underground,” and the “fashion arbiter of her generation.” In addition to editorial projects with Juergen Teller and Harley Weir, the 32-year-old Russian works with the menswear designer Gosha Rubchinskiy, styled Sander Lak’s debut Sies Marjan collection last February, and will be aiding and abetting Johnny Coca at Mulberry for the first time next month. But it is her ongoing collaboration with the rule-breaking Demna Gvasalia that has electrified the fashion world and earned her those superlatives, his clothes for Balenciaga and Vetements being among the most coveted and copied around. I sat down with Volkova on the eve of her summer holiday in California to talk styling, the influence of Instagram, and the industry’s love-hate relationship with speed and excess. She’s thoughtful and animated on the subject of all three, quick with a laugh and a candid comment. This interview is part of an ongoing series about the future of fashion shows, but it was just as much a conversation about Volkova’s own future. Photography and filmmaking are both interests of hers. At age 19 she had a collection of ripped and ravaged jeans called Lotta Skeletrix, and someday she could try her hand at design again. For the moment, though, she’s “quite fulfilled” disrupting things alongside Gvasalia. “Disruption” has been fashion’s favorite talking point this year, but it seems to me that it’s standard operating procedure for you and Demna. We’ll be having a drink, and I’ll say, “What if we [fill in the blank],” and he’ll say, “Yeah, we should do it.” And he’ll do it. Not many people would be able to follow through with some crazy, stupid thing, like with the Depot [the underground Paris club where Vetements’s third collection was shown]. I had a little brand when I was 19 in London. A friend of mine, Thom Murphy, who is a stylist, said, “You should do a show, and you should do it at the Depot, this sex club in Paris. Everybody during Fashion Week goes there. You’ll do a show there and people will just be there automatically.” Demna wanted to do that show at Le Queen originally, at a nightclub in a dark space. I was like, “Why not Depot?” We hesitated at the beginning, because Depot is quite small, but then he met them and they said we could use downstairs and upstairs. Again, it was cool because somebody else would’ve been like: The space is too small, the space is too tricky. We just worked around it and kind of sacrificed the idea of a perfect catwalk, because we thought it was exciting for the atmosphere. That’s how we work. If you really like something, you make it work. People think it’s completely different from doing things normally, but in reality it’s just an accident. I saw you wearing a Disruption T-shirt on Instagram, in fact. How important is that to you as a concept? We follow our intuition. That kind of instinct is disruptive in the end because what we like isn’t what everybody else likes, but we don’t care. In the end, I think that’s why everybody reacted so positively, so fast. They felt it was real. Even though aesthetically it might not be everyone’s taste, somehow people were excited by the fact that we were just having fun. What do you think of the new Instagram Stories? I like it; it’s fun. I’m not on Snapchat. My friend told me about it a year ago: “You have to get on Snapchat—it’s new, it’s the future.” I got it, but never really got into it. I like Instagram because it’s kind of like a little mood board. You find pictures you like, you post pictures that inspire you, and, of course, a little selfie here, a little selfie there. It’s something that makes you excited. Snapchat is literally about what’s happening in your life. It’s even more intrusive. I’ve only posted a few things on Instagram Stories [so far], but they weren’t videos. I still haven’t. I’m a bit scared. The videos tend to be so mundane, but still I can’t stop watching. Yeah, it’s the voyeur thing. I think that’s an interesting point, what exactly people put out there. Speaking of putting yourself out there, why do you put yourself in the Vetements shows? Ooh la la! [laughs]. That came by accident, in a way, or maybe Demna plotted it all along. I never intended to open a show; I don’t really care about it. But you know, for him, it meant something; I’m a friend, somebody whom he makes clothes for. That’s the kind of people we have in our casting anyway, our friends, people Demna would imagine wearing the clothes. I remember the first season, we had a lot of our circle of friends, but we still needed a few models, and at that point it was really hard with agencies. They didn’t really understand. In the end, it was a natural reaction against the fact that we couldn’t get the models at the right price. That’s why we used predominantly street casting; it happened naturally. And now I bet they’re begging you to be in the show. The budgets still are not crazy, but things have changed. How involved are you in terms of conceiving of the actual show? I’m present at all meetings, and we always discuss. If I don’t feel right about certain music or a location, Demna really trusts me. At the men’s show, I was not there at the original viewing of the space, and we had to change quite a lot of things, because I was like, this doesn’t feel quite right. That sounds like a big deal. It wasn’t that dramatic. But it’s so important to create the right atmosphere. When you’re looking at the collection, and if it doesn’t work—if the light is wrong or the space—it’s such a shame. The show is a happening; I wouldn’t go so far as to say it’s a performance art piece. It’s a happening that has to leave you with a feeling about the collection. It’s not about seeing every single detail on a piece of clothing. It’s about a general vibe. At the Vetements show at the Chinese restaurant Le Président, the models walked so fast, it was crazy. I’m sure people didn’t see everything, but again, it was about energy, about creating energy. Do you think the live experience is still important? It’s important for people who work in the industry. I don’t think it’s important for the world in general, to be honest. It’s interesting to present clothes to a small amount of people who are writing about it and the people who have to buy it. It’s the domino effect. If you turn on the right people, it shows up in magazines, it shows up in stores. I don’t think it has a long-term influence, actually. It’s quite an insider’s thing. But I do think people work so hard in fashion, it’s nice to be able to sit down for 10 minutes and experience the clothes the way the designer wants you to experience them. I think that’s important for people in the industry, not necessarily even the people who buy the clothes. I don’t think that people who don’t work in fashion look at Vogue.com or actually look at every single collection. But young people do. Kids do. It’s incredible how aware they are. Are young people looking on computers or on phones? I think most of them are on social media. The brands that they like, like Raf Simons, they’ll go [online] and look them up. When you are working with designers, do you think about the social media moments? Not really. Mind you, they had drones at the last menswear show. And the women’s show used that 360-degree camera technology for the live-stream. That show was a total experience. That’s what Demna wanted it to be: 360 degrees. Immersive. It was quite funny, we were watching the screen, and when the show finished, people waited a moment before they started clapping, and we were like: Oh, my God, they didn’t like it. It was such a stressful moment; it was really funny. So you get nervous? Of course. But of course they did like it. A lot. What do you not like about fashion shows? What should change? I think the speed, this incredible, crazy speed. This need to produce so much clothes. I think that’s slightly out of control. I don’t really know what’s the way out, or what’s the way to change it. Recycle? I don’t know. But I think the industry feels slightly overwhelmed. It’s a lot of everything at this point. But I think it’s happening, people are starting to do things their own way, look at different strategies, and more from a personal point of view. I think that’s really important. Fashion used to be a creative business. It’s supposed to be a creative job, and I think it’s important that people who are creative have a chance to survive and produce and make a living. But I think what also changed—our generation doesn’t really believe in rebelling against the system so much. We’re just trying to make the system adapt to what we want and need. I believe there’s always a way to do things your own way. I take it as a challenge. I love to challenge myself. Even to work on a piece of clothing that you don’t necessarily think you would wear or you don’t find interesting. I think it’s quite cool to turn it around, make it something you would find exciting. One issue I see, watching as many shows as I do, is that as stylists become popular and influential, they don’t change their style from one designer to another. What do you think about that? A few years ago before Demna, before Balenciaga, I was working with a lot of young brands, with Gosha [Rubchinskiy], and editorially with different photographers. I really do like a lot of different things. And I met with a friend of mine who’s been working in fashion for a while, and he said, “In order to make it, you need to brand yourself. It needs to be a particular kind of style, and then you brand that style. If they want you, they want you for this.” And I thought: But this makes no sense. A stylist is primarily there to be able to see and work in different contexts and, of course, change with time. But [what he was saying] naturally happened with me. One side of what I do kind of intensified. In a way I guess I do have a style now. And so in a way, yes, it is easier for people to recognize somebody when they put you in a box, basically. I don’t know if it’s good or bad, we’ll see. But for sure, this is how it works. When we met, I was flattered Demna wanted to work with me; I was quite young. Demna said, “I had people asking to work with me, but it’s important for me to work with someone from my generation, to do it our way, and not have to take somebody’s style that already exists and apply it to what we do.” That comes from designers not being too courageous. A lot of people want to be safe. My generation, we all got bored of this feeling of being safe in fashion. There’s nothing wrong with commercial. For me, fashion is about making clothes, clothes have to be worn, that’s what we do; we want to see people wearing these clothes. It’s a commercial business. It’s not art that you hang on the wall. For me, it’s a positive thing that pieces sell. For Demna, too, and for Sander [Lak, the designer of Sies Marjan], and a lot of people I work with. But this feeling of safety is fake; nobody is ever safe in general in life, I think. Backtracking, what are the things that you don’t like? Espadrilles. Flip-flops [laughs]. Maybe a year from now we’ll see espadrilles at Balenciaga. As far as challenges go, do you see yourself getting back into design? A lot of people have asked me that recently. I don’t know; at the moment I feel really fulfilled. I think it’s really important to collaborate to exchange energy. I don’t know what I’d do at this point by myself. In order to do your own thing, it’s a reaction or a search for something you can’t find in the market. When I started my brand, I wanted to do these crazy ripped-up jeans with studs, really punked-up clothes. I was super-young and it was really naive and innocent. I made those for myself and it sort of caught on, so I started making them for my friends, then people wanted to buy them. It has to be something you can’t find that encourages you to make it. But right now I’m quite fulfilled. You’re working with people making the things you want. Exactly. With great factories and amazing ateliers. It was quite a relief when I started styling after closing my brand. It was amazing to see all those clothes turn up and not have to worry about that. For me, even when I made clothes, the most important part of it was producing the final image. A lookbook, a campaign. A mood. For me, that has always been the most exciting part of the job. In a way I’ve always been more drawn to styling or art directing or taking a picture. Maybe photography? I’ve studied photography. It’s something I’m interested in. And movies. I’ve always wanted to make short films. That may be the future. Do you have favorite directors? David Lynch, Gregg Araki, those films that talk about youth, subcultures. I love cinema of transgression. Richard Kern. All those kinds of kids and the type of movies they made, quite punk rock, and kind of a reaction against the Reagan era. If I do make short movies, it would be more like short sketches, not with plot or anything. More atmospheric. I worked with Renata Litvinova with Gosha; she’s this amazing director from Russia. [In the film she made,] I was hanging out and dressed as a soldier. It inspired both Gosha and me, how she’s always thinking about creating a scene. Even little moments in a day she describes as a scene in a movie. Her brain works so differently. It seems like fashion film is still a relatively untapped area. I think it’s hard to make short movies. And it’s hard to make short fashion movies. You shouldn’t try to make a fashion movie. You should have an idea you want to work with and make a little film, and clothes are just a part of it as an element. With Renata, in the end we didn’t even use some of the clothes in the movie in the show. The clothes were secondary. Maybe that’s why they go wrong; it’s a brand that tends to pay for them, so it’s all one brand. It’s about the purpose of it—why do you make a movie, why do you make a photograph? A movie is harder because it has to capture you, otherwise you just switch it off and you move on. With a photograph it’s much more immediate. It has to be intimate to capture your attention as a film. Clothes are secondary. It’s just costume design. It has to have an idea behind it, a plot, a purpose. If your purpose is just to sell the clothes, it’s not a movie, it’s not a film. That’s where people get it wrong. It definitely hasn’t been explored that much. Let’s see what happens. This conversation has been condensed and edited. Read Vogue.com’s Future of the Fashion Show interview with Susie Lau. Read Vogue.com’s Future of the Fashion Show interview with Adrian Joffe. Read Vogue.com’s Future of the Fashion Show interview with producer Gayle Dizon. Read Vogue.com’s Future of the Fashion Show interview with Ruth and Tom Chapman of MatchesFashion.com.  

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These Bombshell Models Are Reshaping the Fashion Industry—Literally and Figuratively

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Sometimes change comes slowly, tiptoeing into the room, and sometimes it comes crashing though the barricades, as brazen as a flower bomb exploding on a catwalk. One day—or one season—you wake up and see, instead of a line of ashen teenage waifs, an explosion of voluptuous beauty, a delectable, curvy carnival of real women beginning to make its way down at least a few fashion runways. “I see things happening now that would have never happened in the past,” says model-of-the-moment Irina Shayk. “We are living in such a different time, and America is embracing a more expansive idea of beauty.” The slender but undeniably shapely Shayk, who counts Givenchy’s Riccardo Tisci among her fans, thinks “the Internet and reality television really changed things—nowadays, anything goes.” Shayk knows whereof she speaks. Everywhere you turn, from pop culture to fashion, from the music industry to the entertainment world, from TV to the red carpet, the verdict is in: We’re in the midst of a movement that celebrates diverse shapes and sizes, that demands a more accurate depiction of women in the larger culture. If the eye has to travel, it has lately found itself gazing approvingly at a shifting landscape, where our ideas of attractiveness are rapidly expanding, both literally and—if you will pardon the pun—figuratively. Gorgeous celebrities are turning to Twitter and gleefully shaming the fat-shamers; Kim Kardashian West’s astonishing proportions have garnered mainstream acceptance. The developments extend way beyond national boundaries—in France, a law to ensure that models are healthy is on the books; in London, Mayor Sadiq Khan has banned advertising images that promote unrealistic body images from the city’s transit system. And in a coup that would have been unthinkable a very short time ago, the plus-size model Ashley Graham graced the cover of Sports Illustrated’s latest swimsuit issue. “It was like a miracle,” she recalls. “I am still pinching myself. It felt like finally something is changing, opening up a door—somebody was doing something!” This burgeoning movement has undeniably been fed and fueled by the rise of social media. Think about it—not so long ago, beauty and fashion dictates came down from on high, the consumer consumed them, and that was that. Now anyone from model to movie star to middle schooler can weigh in—posting pictures of themselves, offering aperçus, applauding, critiquing. If this opens the floodgates to the inevitable mean-spirited comments, Graham merely shrugs. “Haters gonna hate—there’s always someone who’s going to call me fat or even say, ‘How can you be a model?’ Without social media, my career wouldn’t be what it is—a place where people who look like me have a voice.” Candice Huffine, another larger model breaking down barriers, has been waiting for this moment to arrive for at least a decade. “It is a magical time,” she says. “There are so many platforms where you can see people being real, loving themselves. A young girl seeing me on social media can think, I can just be, I can be happy—why am I spending all this time to lose 20 pounds?” And if Huffine posts a pic of herself in a bikini on Memorial Day weekend and some anonymous freak in cyberspace leaves an ugly message, does she care? What do you think? But you don’t have to be plus-size (a term that is, by the way, rapidly being consigned to the linguistic dustbin) to be part of the revolution. Slim-but-sexy bombshells like Taylor Hill and Anna Ewers are the latest shining stars in the fashion firmament, and Gigi Hadid has answered faceless bullies on Instagram by boldly stating, “Yes, I have boobs, I have abs, I have a butt, I have thighs, but I’m not asking for special treatment. . . . Your mean comments don’t make me want to change my body, they don’t make me want to say no to the designers that ask me to be in their shows, and they definitely don’t change the designers’ opinions of me.” Imaan Hammam, who has walked runways from Prada to Fendi to Dior, thinks that the broadening definition of beauty “has definitely taken over the fashion and beauty industries. You can actually see changes in the advertising, runway shows, and the clothes and beauty products being sold.” Because this is a young movement, inextricably linked to social media, it stands to reason that younger designers have embraced size diversity. It is also, with the exception of Tisci and a few other trailblazers, a frankly American phenomenon—maybe because we struggle so openly with issues of identity politics, individuality, and social change. Look no further than the fall 2016 runways of hot labels like Hood By Air and Gypsy Sport, or talk to people like Carly Cushnie and Michelle Ochs of Cushnie et Ochs. “All kinds of women aspire to dress a certain way, to put their body on display and have it positively accepted,” Cushnie says, adding that it’s not really about the male gaze anymore—it’s about dressing for your own pleasure (which, when you think about it, is a pretty radical notion). Likewise, the designer Becca McCharen-Tran of Chromat has always put an extremely diverse cast of characters on her saucy runways. “So many amazing women are not size 0,” she says. “The whole definition of a supermodel is expanding.” Prabal Gurung—at 37 the elder statesman in this crowd—has just signed on to do a line for Lane Bryant, an exercise in inclusiveness he says he has been longing for. “On a skinny fourteen-year-old model, even a sock looks good,” he says. “My challenge as a designer is to make women of all sizes look good! I want to be on television talking about this! I want to be in the forefront of this conversation.” Then again, maybe the revolution is already here. In the wise words of Ashley Graham: “The rest of the world is not looking at the number in the back of your pants.” Hammam: Fashion Editor: Sara Moonves; Hair: Duffy; Makeup: Sally Branka Huffine: Fashion Editor: Tabitha Simmons; Hair: Tamara McNaughton; Makeup: Romy Soleimani; Produced by Fill in the Blank Production   Get the September issue on Amazon.  

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